What 2020 Taught Me

2020 was full of memorable moments. Most weren’t the sort I usually reminisce over – hikes, trips away and the like – but they were memorable moments nonetheless.

Moments that sparked laughter, or joy.

Moments that, in a normal year, would be long since lost to the murky depths of my memory.

Like the time we saw two ducks waddling round M&S. Or the time we ended up with flakes of non-stick saucepan in the crème pâtissière. Or the day we saw a peacock preening in front of a car on someone’s driveway in Little Eversden. Or the time a cat tried to jump through our bathroom window. Or the first time we saw the Brampton Road Safari Park. (Not a real safari park, I hasten to add, but rather an eclectic front garden filled with artfully arranged toy animals.) Or the day we found a frog in my parents’ garden.

There was more to 2020 than culinary blunders and animal encounters, though. Laurence and I spent countless weekends and days off cycling around East Anglia. (With the roads devoid of traffic for months on end, I went from barely using my bike in 2019 to cycling 2,242km in 2020.) Places like Wicken Fen and Wimpole, which had long sat on our doorstep, finally found their way to the top of our agenda. We cycled to Norwich to spend a few days with Laurence’s parents, and squeezed in a trip to my parents in Chester just before new restrictions came into effect.

Along the way, I discovered that there are wild snakes in Cambridge, that my plants don’t need watering nearly as often as I think they do, and that bagels are surprisingly easy to make. Here are a handful of other things 2020 taught me:

Go outside. Even if it’s cloudy. Even if it’s drizzling. Especially if it’s snowing. Sometimes it’s very tempting to curl up on the sofa with a steaming mug of tea, but I always feel better for a short walk. A brisk walk around the block is enough to blow the cobwebs away; a stroll around Coldham’s Common better still.

Find a creative outlet. Back in the early days of the first lockdown, my Brownie unit did ‘catch-a-story’ comics over Zoom. We started with the classic opener ‘Once upon a time…’ and, one by one, each girl added a few words to build a story. (Our protagonist was a flamingo-turned-slug-turned-dragonfly… quite the transformation!) A few rounds of the virtual circle later, we told the girls to draw their own endings to the story in comic strip form. I enjoyed it so much that my one-line-a-day scrapbook became a comic strip project, each day a colourful snapshot of virtual quizzes, walks, bike rides, bakes and more.

Put your work laptop away at the end of the day. Or close the door on it, if you’re lucky enough to have a spare room to work in. Out of sight, out of mind.

Chocolate bananas complete a BBQ. Slice a banana in half, put a few chunks of chocolate in the middle, wrap it in foil and leave it on the embers. Once you’ve polished off your burger or hot dog, you’ll have a warm banana with melted chocolate waiting for you. Yum. (Credit to Laurence’s friend George for this idea; it was something we turned to on many occasions last summer.)

Save little and often. Over time, the pennies add up. Life throws curveballs (2020, I’m looking at you), and a rainy day fund can help you weather the storm. (Side note: I’m very fortunate to have worked from home and consequently saved considerably more than I would usually be able to over the past ten months.)

Move more. It’s so easy – too easy – to spend the entire working day hunched over your kitchen table and glued to the screen, and I for one don’t fancy ending up like Emma, dubbed the work colleague of the future. (Google it – it paints a pretty grim picture of office life.) Build a fake commute into your day, even if it’s just a fifteen minute walk, or stack a few shoeboxes on an ironing board for a half-decent standing desk.

Spend time with those you love. 2020 made me realise I don’t travel home nearly as often as I should (in an average year, I’d go home for a long weekend over the summer and a week or so at Christmas). Sure, trains can be hideously expensive and annual leave is finite, but time with family is priceless.

Don’t be afraid to spend money on yourself. I enjoy choosing presents for others, but I can rarely justify treating myself to anything – beyond a bag of Haribo or a slice of cake from my favourite café, that is. After deliberating for five (yes, five) months, I took the plunge and bought myself a pair of Lucy and Yak dungarees. They’re super comfy, and my only regret is not buying them sooner.

25 Life Lessons from 25 Years

A couple of weeks back, I turned twenty-five; a quarter of a century, another year gone in what feels like the blink of an eye. Time waits for no (wo)man, but I’m pretty happy with how things have turned out so far: I have friends and family who are there for me no matter what; I’ve worked abroad – twice; and I’ve got a job I enjoy with a steady income. I’m not so keen on living in Cambridge, for a number of reasons, but that’s about the extent of my woes.

I’ve enjoyed reading others’ musings on lessons learnt over the years, so I figured I’d mark the occasion with a list of my own. Here are twenty five lessons I’ve learnt over the past twenty five years.

Continue reading “25 Life Lessons from 25 Years”